Login

Search

We have 6960 groups in 289 locations listed on this site! Knit on, everyone!

Recently Updated Groups

1. New Haven
    
2. Maynooth, Co. Kildare
    
3. Trieste, Italy
    
4. Ontario
    
5. Wilmington
    

Stitch 'n Bitch Groups

A Gestural Interface for Smart Watches | MIT Technology Review

Group Name
180
Meeting Location
180
Address
180, New York, 180, 180, 180
Meeting Day
180
Meeting Time
180
Contact E-mail
Group Website
[b]swiss replica watches[/b]
[b][url=http://www.swisswatches-collection.com/]replica watches[/url][/b]


Device Recharges Moving Cars
Martin LaMonica
10
Three Questions for Dmitry Grishin
Rachel Metz
Regulators Back Bitcoin
Josh Dzieza
Genomics Solves Pediatric Medical Mysteries
Susan Young
See More Top Stories
Menu
News & Analysis
Magazine
Lists
Events
About
More
Features
Views
Multimedia
Discussions
Topics
Popular:
Encrypted Internet
Boeing's Origami
Solar Water Splitting
Hydrogen Toyota
Self-Healing Batteries
Innovative iPad Display
Jawbone Real-Time Tracking
Subscribe
Current Issue
Past Issues
MIT News Magazine
International Editions
Business Reports
Special Publications
Subscriptions »
Innovators Under 35
Disruptive Companies
Breakthrough Technologies
Nominations »
Upcoming Events
Partner Events
Emtech MIT
MIT Enterprise Forum
Our Team
Join Us
Press Room
Awards
Advertise
Permissions
Contact Us
Customer Support »
Support
Contact Us
Emtech MIT
MIT Enterprise Forum
Connect
The Latest
Popular
Most Shared
My Profile
watches Unsupported browser: Your browser does not meet modern web standards. See how it scores »
Comments
Email
Service
Service
More Share
Print
A Gestural Interface for Smart Watches
Web News
1 comment
A Gestural Interface for Smart Watches
A 3-D gesture-recognition chip could make it a lot easier to use smart watches and head-mounted computers.
By Rachel Metz on November 1, 2013
Why It Matters
replica watches A 3-D gesture-recognition chip could make it a lot easier to use smart watches and head-mounted computers.
Sound waves: Shown on a penny are the ultrasound chip and the electronics chip that make up Chirp, a 3-D gesture-recognition system that uses ultrasonic sound waves to identify motions, as well as a battery that can run the system for 30 hours.
swiss replica watches If just thinking about using a tiny touch screen on a smart watch has your fingers cramping up, researchers at the University of California at Berkeley and Davis may soon offer some relief: they’re developing a tiny chip that uses ultrasound waves to detect a slew of gestures in three dimensions. The chip could be implanted in wearable gadgets.all brand watches The technology, called Chirp, is slated to be spun out into its own company, Chirp Microsystems, to produce the chips and sell them to hardware manufacturers. They hope that Chirp will eventually be used in everything from helmet cams to smart watches—basically any electronic device you want to control but don’t have a convenient way to do so.swiss watches “There aren’t a whole lot of options of what you can do on a touch screen when it’s about the size of a quarter or so,” says Richard Przybyla, a graduate student at UC Berkeley’s Berkeley Sensor & Actuator Center, who designed the ultrasound chip.copy watches Chirp is one of a growing number of efforts to bring gesture controls to all kinds of consumer electronics, like Microsoft’s Kinect and Leap Motion’s Leap Motion Controller. Some methods aim to make it easier to integrate gesture controls into gadgets like laptops and smartphones by using hardware already built into the device: Microsoft  Research’s SoundWave project relies on your speaker and microphone, while Flutter, recently acquired by Google, uses your webcam.But Chirp’s team believes that its technology, which requires building an electronics and an ultrasound chip into the device you want to control, allows for much more accurate gestures and lower power consumption—and can work in the dark or bright light—making it ideal for small electronics such as smart watches and head-mounted computers like Google Glass.Chirp uses sonar via an array of ultrasound transducers—small acoustic resonators—that send ultrasonic pulses outward in a hemisphere, echoing off any objects in their path (your palm, for instance). Those echoes come back to the transducers, and the elapsed time is measured by a connected electronic chip. When using a two-dimensional array of transducers, the time measurements can be used to detect a range of hand gestures in three dimensions within a distance of about a meter.Przybyla showed me a demo of Chirp at the lab he works out of at UC Berkeley, where the chips that comprise it were hooked up to a computer, allowing me to control a computer-animated plane’s flight path on a monitor by moving my hand in front of the display. Since the demo included a linear array of transducers, rather than a two-dimensional array, I was only able to check out Chirp in two dimensions (meaning I could control the plane’s side-to-side and forward-and-backward movements, but could not move it up and down). The group has built a chip with a two-dimensional array, but Przybyla says it’s still working to improve Chirp’s ability to track that up-and-down angle. It was noticeably easier to control on my first try than some other kinds of gesture-recognition technologies I’ve tried, and didn’t seem to require any calibration to sense most of my movements accurately.
Przybyla says the researchers behind Chirp envision determining a basic set of gesture commands that could be programmed into Chirp-enabled devices, like pulling your hand away from your smartphone’s screen in order to zoom in on a photo.Since the system uses sound, which travels much slower than light, it can use low-speed electronics for sensing, which dramatically lowers the system’s overall power consumption, Przybyla says, allowing it to run off a watch battery continuously for 30 hours.Chris Harrison, a founder and the chief technology officer of Qeexo, a company that makes new touch-screen interface technology, is impressed by the power-consumption claims of Chirp’s team. While there are potential drawbacks like figuring out when a user is trying to, say, open a message on a smart watch versus simply moving his hand near his smart watch, Harrison can imagine the utility of Chirp on such gadgets, whose itty-bitty displays can make them a pain to use.“If you can move that interaction to the air around it, which is many times larger, it has the potential of alleviating that bottleneck,” he says.Right now, Chirp is just tracking hand motions, but may eventually try individual finger tracking, Przybyla says—a move that could enable better recognition, and perhaps a broader range of identifiable movements. The current chips the group is using are about five millimeters across; they can be made as small as one to two millimeters and still be able to track basic hand gestures.
1 comment. Share your thoughts »
0
comments
about this story.
Start the discussion »
Credit: Image courtesy of Richard Przybyla
Tagged:
Computing, Business, Communications, Web, mobile, smartphone, ultrasound, gesture recognition, wearable technology, smart watch, Kinect, Leap, Chirp
Reprints
and Permissions
|
Send feedback to the editor

Related stories
You may have missed
More from this author
Three Questions for Russian Internet Mogul Dmitry Grishin
The CEO of Russia’s biggest Internet company explains why he hopes to make a splash in the U.S. app market.
Continue
0
Pebble Sets Sights on Fitness Trackers with New App-Making Tools
2
Phone Makers’ Android Tweaks Cause Security Problems
0
With Firefox OS, an $80 Smartphone Tries to Prove Its Worth
6
Jawbone’s New Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
6
The Internet Killed Distance. Mobile Computing Brought It Back.
1
It’s All E-Commerce Now
4
Review: Qualcomm’s Toq Is a Watch Smart Enough to Keep It Simple
4
Free Software Ties the Internet of Things Together
5
A Gooey Cure for Crack-Prone High-Capacity Batteries
Polymer glue helps fracture-prone high-capacity batteries last through more charges.
Continue
3
The Decline of Wikipedia
The community that built the world’s largest encyclopedia is shrinking. Is this the end of the Web’s idealistic era?
Continue
253
How Toyota Will Be First With a Fuel-Cell Car
Toyota says it has reduced the cost of fuel cells significantly enough to sell hydrogen cars for under $100,000.
Continue
30
Lurking Inside the iPad Is the Future of High-Def Displays
The appearance of indium gallium zinc oxide transistors in iPads shows that the display industry is poised to begin churning...
Continue
4
Three Questions for Computing Pioneer Carver Mead
Carver Mead christened Moore’s Law and helped make it come true. Now he says engineers should experiment with quantum...
Continue
3
Jawbone’s New Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
Jawbone’s new activity-tracking wristband can be used to start your coffeemaker when you get up.
Continue
6
Rachel Metz Editor

View Profile »
Follow @RachelMetz
Google+
RSS
Three Questions for Russian Internet Mogul Dmitry Grishin
0
Apple Buying PrimeSense? Makes Sense.
0
Can Same-Day Delivery Succeed This Time?
1
Dropbox Gets Bigger and Bigger
2
Jawbone’s New Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
6
Pebble Sets Sights on Fitness Trackers with New App-Making Tools
2
Phone Makers’ Android Tweaks Cause Security Problems
0
A Gestural Interface for Smart Watches
1
See all from this author
The Latest
Popular
Most Shared
2 hours ago
Liquid Metal Printer Lays Electronic Circuits on Paper, Plastic and Even Cotton
7 hours ago
Russian Internet Tycoon Dmitry Grishin Talks Apps, Hardware Startups, and Robots
8 hours ago
Regulators and Law Enforcement Boost Bitcoin’s Prospects
20 hours ago
How to Recharge Cars on the Move
20 hours ago
Children’s Hospital Turns to Genomic Analyses to Treat Severely Sick Newborns
1 day ago
Apple Buying PrimeSense? Makes Sense.
1 day ago
By Next Year, Parts of the Internet Could Be Encrypted by Default
1 day ago
The Online Dating Engine that Assesses Your Taste In the Opposite Sex (And Whether They Find You Attractive)
1 day ago
Boeing’s New Origami Airliner
1 day ago
Sound Off on Optimizing Resources Amid Increasing Scarcity #FutureBusinessSAP #BroughtToYouBy @SAP
1 day ago
Steve Case Is Back, and Betting on E-Commerce
2 days ago
Batteries Last Longer by Healing Their Own Cracks
3 days ago
Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week Ending 16 November 2013)
4 days ago
Oil Companies Happy, Biofuels Companies Distraught Over New EPA Rules
4 days ago
Best Tech Stories from Around the Web (November 11-November 15)
4 days ago
Seven Stories You Shouldn’t Miss (Week Ending November 15, 2013)
See full archive
20 hours ago
How to Recharge Cars on the Move
1 day ago
Boeing’s New Origami Airliner
5 days ago
Artificial Photosynthesis Made Practical
4 days ago
How Toyota Has Lowered the Cost of the Hydrogen Fuel Cell
2 days ago
Batteries Last Longer by Healing Their Own Cracks
1 day ago
By Next Year, Parts of the Internet Could Be Encrypted by Default
5 days ago
New iPad Has Higher-Performing Transistors Running Its Pixels
1 week ago
Graphene Supercapacitors Ready for Electric Vehicle Energy Storage, Say Korean Engineers
6 days ago
A Smart Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
1 week ago
For Retailers, Tracking Shoppers Brings New Insights
5 days ago
Same-Day Delivery Is Back as Web Retailers Clamor to Stand Out
1 week ago
A New Class of Material Could Make Solar Power Much Cheaper
1 day ago
Steve Case Is Back, and Betting on E-Commerce
1 day ago
The Online Dating Engine that Assesses Your Taste In the Opposite Sex (And Whether They Find You Attractive)
5 days ago
Google Finally Gets Legal OK to Scan the World’s Books
4 days ago
How Social Robotics is Revolutionising Therapy for Autistic Children
See full archive
20 hours ago
How to Recharge Cars on the Move
1 day ago
By Next Year, Parts of the Internet Could Be Encrypted by Default
4 days ago
How Toyota Has Lowered the Cost of the Hydrogen Fuel Cell
6 days ago
A Smart Wristband Adds You to the Internet of Things
5 days ago
Google Finally Gets Legal OK to Scan the World’s Books
1 week ago
For Retailers, Tracking Shoppers Brings New Insights
1 week ago
Graphene Supercapacitors Ready for Electric Vehicle Energy Storage, Say Korean Engineers
1 week ago
The Secret Ingredient in Computational Creativity
4 weeks ago
The Fight to Save Wikipedia from Itself
1 month ago
How Google Converted Language Translation Into a Problem of Vector Space Mathematics
1 year ago
Given Tablets but No Teachers, Ethiopian Children Teach Themselves
2 years ago
Astronomers Find First Evidence Of Other Universes
8 months ago
Astrobiologists Find Ancient Fossils in Fireball Fragments
1 year ago
First Teleportation from One Macroscopic Object to Another
6 months ago
Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years
5 months ago
How Technology Is Destroying Jobs
See full archive
Show comments »
Conversation powered by Livefyre
swiss replica watches
replica watches
Advertisement

 


 
 Introducing: Raging Wool
150x150ad.gif

 T-shirts and Gifts for the Fiber-Obsessed

www.ragingwool.com

Polls

Which are you?
 
Webdesign auf Usedom and Joomla